Spit Junction Public Art Installations



Green and Gold Tree Frog by Thomas Jackson

“I was recently invited to Taronga Zoo to see their Regent Honey Eater breeding program...they also have a breeding program for a special native frog, the Corroboree Frog. Although this is not the Green and Gold Bell Frog, this frog is also a native NSW frog that is a threatened species. Climate change, habitat destruction and domesticated pets have all added to the depleting numbers of this special frog and efforts are being made to boost their numbers and habitats. I feel that this, although a different species, will highlight the necessity of protecting our fragile ecosystem and bring awareness and profile to another special little native.”

Moving from the UK to Sydney’s northern beaches as a child, artist and illustrator Thomas was instantly drawn to the natural wildlife of this new country. Fascinated by the local animals and landscapes, he drew inspiration from his new home, as well as scientific plant and animal specimens, entomology and taxidermy.’ Today, Thomas puts a modern take on ‘Natural History Illustration’, painstakingly creating smaller scale works for galleries and translating these into large scale public murals. http://www.thomasjackson.com.au



Always was, always will be by Warwick Keen

“Carved trees have been scarred by Aboriginal people for various purposes, from cutting out bark for a canoe to spiritual purposes. For many east coast groups across south east NSW the scarification of their markings take shape in the form of diamonds representing the southern cross.”

"This pattern is a derivation of designs that were once carved into trees in south-eastern Australia. They are known as dendroglyphs, the designs emanate from natural forms within the landscape."

Dendroglyphs were created to signpost significant cultural sites (burials and initiation) within the country. My designs are not copied from actual patterning, they are a contemporary response to a now lost traditional art practice.

Warwick has been a practising artist for over 40 years and has taught Fine Arts, Visual Arts & Aboriginal Cultural Arts at TAFE NSW for over 20 years. He creates mainstream and indigenous imagery experiments with a wide range of mediums, including drawing, painting, wood- carving, photography and digital manipulation to express his “stories”. He was a featured artist in the exhibition “Bungaree: the First Australian” at Mosman Art Gallery as part of the bicentennial celebrations associated with the establishment of Bungaree’s Farm, the first land grant by colonial authorities to an Aboriginal person in Australia.



Green and Gold Tree Frog by Thomas Jackson

“I was recently invited to Taronga Zoo to see their Regent Honey Eater breeding program...they also have a breeding program for a special native frog, the Corroboree Frog. Although this is not the Green and Gold Bell Frog, this frog is also a native NSW frog that is a threatened species. Climate change, habitat destruction and domesticated pets have all added to the depleting numbers of this special frog and efforts are being made to boost their numbers and habitats. I feel that this, although a different species, will highlight the necessity of protecting our fragile ecosystem and bring awareness and profile to another special little native.”

Moving from the UK to Sydney’s northern beaches as a child, artist and illustrator Thomas was instantly drawn to the natural wildlife of this new country. Fascinated by the local animals and landscapes, he drew inspiration from his new home, as well as scientific plant and animal specimens, entomology and taxidermy.’ Today, Thomas puts a modern take on ‘Natural History Illustration’, painstakingly creating smaller scale works for galleries and translating these into large scale public murals. http://www.thomasjackson.com.au



Always was, always will be by Warwick Keen

“Carved trees have been scarred by Aboriginal people for various purposes, from cutting out bark for a canoe to spiritual purposes. For many east coast groups across south east NSW the scarification of their markings take shape in the form of diamonds representing the southern cross.”

"This pattern is a derivation of designs that were once carved into trees in south-eastern Australia. They are known as dendroglyphs, the designs emanate from natural forms within the landscape."

Dendroglyphs were created to signpost significant cultural sites (burials and initiation) within the country. My designs are not copied from actual patterning, they are a contemporary response to a now lost traditional art practice.

Warwick has been a practising artist for over 40 years and has taught Fine Arts, Visual Arts & Aboriginal Cultural Arts at TAFE NSW for over 20 years. He creates mainstream and indigenous imagery experiments with a wide range of mediums, including drawing, painting, wood- carving, photography and digital manipulation to express his “stories”. He was a featured artist in the exhibition “Bungaree: the First Australian” at Mosman Art Gallery as part of the bicentennial celebrations associated with the establishment of Bungaree’s Farm, the first land grant by colonial authorities to an Aboriginal person in Australia.